SCHOOLS AND THEIR OWN MISCONCEPTION OF WHAT THEY’RE REALLY RESPONSIBLE FOR, BUT NOT

Copyright May 20, 2015

Schools need to stop teaching so much about sex and sex education; gender differentiation; political correctness; worrying over the offensiveness of prayer, religion, our Pledge of Allegiance, our American flag and our American History and trying to remove said items from the schools; talking about politics to our children – who’s running for office what they stand for and why it’s a good thing or not, making sure our children get registered to vote when they turn eighteen if they’re still in school, advising them where they should go to vote and the proper way to fill out a ballot; how their parents are abusing them if either one or both parents do so much as correct them if they’re doing wrong or the child won’t do what they’re told (such as help around the house, it sure didn’t kill me to do it, it won’t kill them!), or for not doing what is right, or worse yet if a parent refuses or restricts their child’s the use of something or the going to somewhere, which might be considered in the eyes of the public forum, a basic right of any child.

Schools need to get back to the basics of teaching reading writing arithmetic work related (like auto shop, science club, etc.) courses, music and arts; and home life survival skills. A few examples from when I was growing up: work weeks where the student goes to a place of business and job shadows someone for a period of an hour or two each day for a month or a full semester; teaching the students how to cook, balance a checkbook, make a budget and stick to it for an entire school year; teach them to iron & sew; how to do minor repairs or maintenance on a car starting with the one many students drive to school once they hit the proper age for such; this is important – the proper way to jump start a car (I run into so many people who don’t know how to do this); how to build something with wood or steel and give the thing internal working parts with a radio control so it will move; encourage experimenting with design and invention. Wow that list is endless.

Schools should keep their noses out of the homes of the children they are teaching unless there is a need for intervention because there is obvious neglect or abuse; and they need to keep their teaching of our children to the knowledge the children need to graduate, not how to take the test to pass it. If the schools would get back to the basics – we would have smarter, better balanced, less brain-washed children who aren’t going to come out believing everyone owes them something, the children would have an improving discernment of wisdom, and the ability to make sound and healthier choices for their lives, on their own, without other people thinking it all through for them, gee now that’s a novel concept, it would be a shocker, wouldn’t it?

Schools, and many parents too, as it stands now, do all the thinking for the children, or create work which is too easy for them – so little Susie and Bill don’t get their little itty bitty feelings hurt if they get a red mark on their paper because they got the answer wrong; and heaven forbid they fail a test, because then it looks bad on the school! So instead of teaching them the materials and skills to study, let’s allow the schools to teach them contents of the test. In fact let’s go one better and give them a “sample test” which has twenty questions on it, eighteen of which will be on the actual test they take – that makes it okay and easier to swallow, right? NOT! We’ll forget any real or meaningful homework, and we should also forego making study hall a requirement after a student fails a test, because it might interfere with the children’s absolute right and need to socialize or play their mindless electronic games after school; or worse yet that assigned homework or study hall after school could inconvenience the parents’ schedule and what they might have planned that evening. My goodness we couldn’t have that now, could we?!

Oh, and you hadn’t better let me get me started about a parent not being allowed to spank their child (not beat them, spank them – there is a difference!) or the child can go to school and tell their teacher, then parent can get into trouble for abuse; or the fact that the schools are handing out sex education and free birth control to the children without parental consent; or that children can go to a clinic or a doctor without their parent for such items or even to have a surgical procedure done – again without parental consent; or the fact that parents are told they can’t search little Susie or Bill’s room, backpack, car, purse, etc. because it’s considered a breach of their own children’s privacy. Wow, the list of how a parent or guardian can infringe on a child’s basic rights just gets longer every day, doesn’t it?

Schools should stop spending so much of their allocated teaching funds their time and their staffing efforts on the responsibilities which are those of the parents to teach in the home. Doing so would more than likely improve their school budgets exponentially. Perhaps then they would be able to keep or bring back the curriculum and programs they’ve cancelled because, “they just can’t afford to have it in their curriculum anymore!”

Okay, I’m done ranting now. I will get down off of my soap box.

I pledge allegiance to our flag of the United States of America…

I honestly don’t care if a citizen of our United States of America is a neon green Yeti from the upper regions of the northern most parts of the paragon of our distinguished State: Alaska, renowned by its ice and snow; or a fascinating drab cyan hybrid extraordinaire Dancing Big Foot from the beautiful and glorious lake regions our State of Minnesota; or an electric muddy purple Swamp Monster with twelve singing appendages sticking out from its head, and which comes from those astonishing also mysterious Bayou’s of the State of Louisiana.  If he or she is a legal citizen of the United States, saying the Pledge of Allegiance in their own language, and as long as they understand and mean what they are saying, then I see no harm in such a thing.

Neither, under those circumstances (and it is not for me to judge someone else’s heart on the matter), would it be a problem for me if they were to sing our National Anthem or any of our patriotic songs in the language with which they grew up, in a group setting or in their own homes or areas in which those who speak a different language may congregate or gather.  However, I would have a problem with it if, and only if, they are representing America before a crowd as often occurs in the setting of a sports arena, or for an audience.  Then, if that citizen has been engaged to say, or sing such items as the Pledge of Allegiance, our National Anthem, or any of our Patriotic songs, and in so doing are representing America for the entire group, crowd, or audience; then I would say for the benefit of all, because of the diversity of said group – the representing citizen of the United States of America should then recite or sing in the English language.

If we say the United States Pledge of Allegiance can only be said in English, then it’s like saying the English language can only be spoken in one way specific way – thereby leaving out the many diverse and multi-cultural ways in which the English language is already spoken in the United States of America today.

If the citizen(s) of our Country is loyal to our Flag and Country, are willing to uphold the laws and fight for the freedoms we now have and plan to keep, then I say let our citizens speak their own cultural language of heritage.  In a group, when not shopping in a culturally specific store, or when speaking with any other English-only speaking citizen, then really due to etiquette and good manners, the citizen(s) should speak English in that situation.

However, I do have an additional belief to this: everyone who is not a naturally born citizen should, before being able to become a citizen, learn through education and be able to fluently speak read and write our (or the) commonly known language of the United States, which is English, at least to the common conversational level.

I believe this true as well for all citizens who are born in the United States, even though and especially if the citizens are raised in their own culturally specific areas of the United States, using or learning their own traditions, language, heritage, history and practices.  These unique rightly born citizens of the United States, I believe must also be taught, and be able to fluently speak read and write our (or the) commonly known language of the United States, which is English, at least to the common conversational level.  This is only reasonable because if we visit another country, as an American citizen, we are expected to know their common conversational language to a reasonable degree.  As well as adhere to their Laws they have set forth in their Country, if we do not we get the consequences of our actions, which is or could be about any number of different things.

Additionally, each citizen should, no matter what language or heritage they come from know the United States History, why it came to be, when, by whom, etc.; and also know the basic National Laws set forth by the United States of America, not just the Laws of the individual State or County or City in which they are living.  I believe there is a saying in our Country, “Ignorance of the law is no excuse.” this then needs to apply to every citizen of the United States of America, not just some.  It also needs to apply to people who come to our Country to visit; there should be none of this “Diplomatic Immunity” horse manure.

Just because someone is in our country and they are a Foreign-Born citizen of another country, a Foreign Dignitary and or International Representative from another country, [for whatever reason it may be that they are in our Country: government business, government work, business, visiting, vacationing, etc.] doesn’t mean they should excluded from obeying our Laws.  The letter of the Law as well as the spirit of the Law, there must be accountability, we do not have harsh Laws in which would kill them immediately should they step over the line.

So, I see no reason for the difference between Untied States of American, citizens, and Foreign-Born citizens being expected to obey our laws; maybe some leniency, yes, but not an exception to being held accountable for breaking our Laws.  We do not get exceptions when we visit their Country; they should not when they visit ours.  Again, “Ignorance of the law excuses no man. Not that all men know the law, but because ’tis an excuse every man will plead, and no man can tell how to refute him.”

Back to the original subject, yes, I want our United States’ Pledge of Allegiance to our flag and our Country back in our schools, in the public arena, our government houses, and at sports events etc.  However, why stop with our Pledge of Allegiance?  I want Christian prayer allowed, for our children who are being raised in Christian homes, brought back into our schools, into the public arena, our government houses, and at sports events etc.

Furthermore, this is OUR Country to which people who are not naturally born citizens are coming, and desiring to become citizens; therefore, it is our right and our responsibility as a Country and as the Citizens of this Great Nation, not to allow those individuals, who would attempt to come into our Country for citizenship to then dictate to the United States of America and its citizens and government what shall be done here in our Country as far as the laws, our heritage, religious practices and freedoms, allegiances, our flag or our patriotic songs.  In other words, we as a Country need not change just because someone has come to our Country doesn’t like the way we do things, but has become a citizen and is now demanding we change our ways of those of the native Country from which they came in the first place.  NO!  No other Country does this, and neither should we.

Having liberty in the United States of America means to have the right to vote; we have our freedom of religion (that of our own choice, including Christianity); the ability to travel about freely; to speak out freely about the way our government runs our Country and so much more.  We are enabled to meet together as a group to examine any topic we wish to discuss, which is unheard of in most countries and it is a death wish in those countries to do so.  We protect these liberties in several ways and I shall name just a few.

By staying informed about our local and national issues, and if we disagree with them, speaking out about it to our government officials, letting them know we want it changed.  We can do this without fear of repercussions.  We can vote – if our government leaders won’t listen to us, we have the right and responsibility as citizens of the United States of America to vote them out of office or to impeach them out of office, whichever applies.  Meanwhile, as we also obey the laws set forth we further help to protect our liberties.  We are free to serve in our Nation’s military to help protect our freedoms, and if not serve in this fashion, we can also provide public or community service.  The list goes on, there are many way in which we may protect and maintain our rights and freedoms, but we must act, or we risk losing everything.  We must stand up for right and renounce and punish that which is wrong or criminal.

You can educate yourself on how to proudly and respectfully display the United States flag, correctly, then do so; learn about our heritage and our history back to the utmost beginnings, even before we landed upon this continent.  Don’t settle for what you learned in school, dig deeper and find the truth behind the original foundations laid by our ancestors.  Be an American citizen who is willing to keep our Country’s liberties and freedoms at all cost, because in any case it is your Country, not some else’s.

Memorize the Declaration of Independence and our National Anthem.  Look into the history books and discover why they brought into fruition; get very familiar with the Constitution of the United States of America.  Learn, if you don’t already know it, the Pledge of Allegiance.  These are things which any foreign-born non-citizen must do as a minimum to become a citizen of the United States of America.  If you cannot do these things, then toss down the stone in your hand and hang your head in shame especially if you are a natural-born citizen of the United States of America.